Difference between revisions of "Kosher Milk"

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==Chalav Yisrael vs Chalav Stam==
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==Background==
#It is rabbinically forbidden to drink milk that was milked from a cow by a non-Jew without a Jew watching out of a concern that he might mix in milk from a non-kosher animal.<ref>Gemara Avoda Zara 35b, Rambam Hilchot Maachalot Asurot 3:15, Tur and S"A YD 115:1, Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter Vol. 2 81:6</ref>
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#In a country where there is a law that makes it illegal to mix milk from other animals into cow milk and sell it as milk, some poskim say that it is permitted to drink kosher milk which isn't chalav yisrael. <ref>Igrot Moshe YD 1:47</ref> Other poskim hold that it is forbidden and so it is proper to be strict except for someone who is sick or a baby. Those who live in the diaspora and it is difficult to be strict on this, have what to rely upon if they are lenient.<ref>Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter vol. 2, 81:12. Yechava Daat 4:42 writes that the accepted halacha is not to accept the Pri Chadash. Chida in Shiurei Bracha 115:1 writes that the minhag of Turkey and Israel is to be strict unlike the Pri Chadash but if the entire minhag of a certain place is to be lenient one can be lenient.</ref> The minhag of Morocco was to be lenient.<ref> Rav Yosef Mashash in Mayim Chayim 2:92 explains why in Morocco everyone was lenient with chalav yisrael. He says that non-kosher milk isn't accessible, even when it is, it is much more expensive. Therefore, there is no concern that the non-Jews mixed non-kosher milk into the cow milk. Furthermore the government has laws ensuring that milk sold as cow milk is really just that. Sherit Yosef 2:191 agrees. Ateret Avot v. 3 p.277 writes that the minhag Morocco was to be lenient and quotes various sources to that effect.
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#It is rabbinically forbidden to drink milk that was milked from a cow by a non-Jew without a Jew watching out of a concern that he might mix in milk from a non-kosher animal<ref>Gemara Avoda Zara 35b, Rambam Hilchot Maachalot Asurot 3:15, Tur and S"A YD 115:1, Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter Vol. 2 81:6</ref>
* [http://www.dailyhalacha.com/displayRead.asp?readID=2381 Rabbi Mansour] writes that one should be strict about chalav yisrael during the aseret yemey teshuva.</ref>
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#In a country where there is a law that makes it illegal to mix milk from other animals into cow milk and sell it as milk, some poskim say that it is permitted to drink kosher milk which isn't chalav yisrael. <ref>Igrot Moshe YD 1:47</ref> Other poskim hold that it is forbidden and so it is proper to be strict except for someone who is sick or a baby. Those who live in the diaspora and it is difficult to be strict on this, have what to rely upon if they are lenient.<ref>Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter vol. 2, 81:12. Yechava Daat 4:42 writes that the accepted halacha is not to accept the Pri Chadash.</ref>
 
# If there are cameras to observe the milking process and a mashgiach watches it many poskim hold that it is called chalav yisrael.<ref>Hakashrut Lmaaseh p. 382 citing Rav Elyashiv (Kovetz Netiv Hachalav v. 3 p. 29) and Rav Wosner</ref>
 
# If there are cameras to observe the milking process and a mashgiach watches it many poskim hold that it is called chalav yisrael.<ref>Hakashrut Lmaaseh p. 382 citing Rav Elyashiv (Kovetz Netiv Hachalav v. 3 p. 29) and Rav Wosner</ref>
  

Revision as of 09:31, 13 June 2019

Background

  1. It is rabbinically forbidden to drink milk that was milked from a cow by a non-Jew without a Jew watching out of a concern that he might mix in milk from a non-kosher animal[1]
  2. In a country where there is a law that makes it illegal to mix milk from other animals into cow milk and sell it as milk, some poskim say that it is permitted to drink kosher milk which isn't chalav yisrael. [2] Other poskim hold that it is forbidden and so it is proper to be strict except for someone who is sick or a baby. Those who live in the diaspora and it is difficult to be strict on this, have what to rely upon if they are lenient.[3]
  3. If there are cameras to observe the milking process and a mashgiach watches it many poskim hold that it is called chalav yisrael.[4]

Butter

  1. Some Geonim held that butter has the status of cheese and butter of a non-Jew is forbidden, while others hold that it isn't like cheese and is permitted even if there was no Jew watching the milking.[5] In a place that the minhag is to be lenient one can be lenient but if the minhag of the majority of the place is strict one should be strict.[6] If there is no minhag one should be strict.[7]

Yogurt

  1. There is a major dispute if yogurt of a non-Jew is permitted.[8]

Powdered Milk

  1. According to some poskim, even powdered milk is included in the rabbinic prohibition of drinking milk when the milking process wasn't supervised by a Jew throughout.[9]

Further Reading

General

Milk Products

Chalav Yisrael

Sources

  1. Gemara Avoda Zara 35b, Rambam Hilchot Maachalot Asurot 3:15, Tur and S"A YD 115:1, Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter Vol. 2 81:6
  2. Igrot Moshe YD 1:47
  3. Yalkut Yosef Isur Viheter vol. 2, 81:12. Yechava Daat 4:42 writes that the accepted halacha is not to accept the Pri Chadash.
  4. Hakashrut Lmaaseh p. 382 citing Rav Elyashiv (Kovetz Netiv Hachalav v. 3 p. 29) and Rav Wosner
  5. Shulchan Aruch 115:3
  6. Shulchan Aruch 115:3 based on the Rosh
  7. Ben Yisrael Lnochri p. 145 citing Tzemach Tzedek Chadashot YD 75. Kaf Hachaim 115:43 writes that the minhag in Baghdad is to be lenient.
  8. Kaf Hachaim 115:50 writes that the minhag of Baghdad was to be lenient but someone who is a Yarei Hashem would be strict since most poskim say it is forbidden.
  9. Chazon Ish YD 115:1 see Chalav Yisrael Part 3 by Rabbi Chaim Jachter who discusses further