Non-muktzeh items

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Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter

Definition

  1. An item that’s primarily used for permitted purposes is called Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter. [1]
  2. A vessel of any size or weight is considered a vessel even if it’s not usually moved during the week and isn’t Muktzeh. However, if one doesn’t move it during the week because one’s afraid of it breaking it’s considered Muktzeh Machmat Chisaron Kis. [2]

Rules

  1. It’s permissible to move or touch a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter item for any purpose. However, even Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter may not be moved for no purpose at all.[3] However, foods and seforim may be moved even without purpose as these items are not muktzah at all. Hacham Ovadia clarifies that foods which are prohibited to eat on shabbat are also prohibited to handle (tiltul). [4]
  2. It’s permissible to move a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter for purposes that serve the vessel itself such as prevent it from breaking or being stolen. [5]
  3. Some say that it's permissible to move a Kli Sh'Melachto LeHeter if one has pleasure in moving it. [6] Additionally, many permit it to help them with nervousness.[7]
  4. It’s forbidden to move a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter without any intent as that’s considered moving it for no purpose. [8]
  5. It is permitted to move a Kli Shemelachto Lheter so that you can use it later that Shabbat, however, it is forbidden to move a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter for a need for after Shabbat as that’s considered moving it for no purpose (for Shabbat). [9]
  6. A minority opinion holds that if you can set the table before Shabbat you should and it would be forbidden because of muktzeh to wait until Shabbat to do that. However, this opinion isn’t accepted.[10]

Examples

  • air freshener [11]
  • alarm clocks [12]
  • artificial plants [13]
  • (baby) rattle as long as it’s moved without it making noise [14]
  • baseball bat, glove and mit [15]
  • binoculars [16]
  • blech [17]
  • blocks (toy) [18]
  • books of secular wisdom [19]
  • broom which have bristles that do not break[20]
  • chess [21]
  • deodorant [22]
  • egg-slicer [23]
  • empty pots used for cooking and serving but not designated for either one [24]
  • empty pots primarily used for serving but are sometimes used for cooking [25]
  • furniture [26]
  • gun for a soldier[27]
  • hair spray [28]
  • handball racket [29]
  • insect repellent [30]
  • kitchen scissors (used to cut food or food bags) [31]
  • ladder used indoors[32]
  • liquid soap[33]
  • magnet [34]
  • marbles [35]
  • microscopes [36]
  • musical toy as long as it’s moved without it making noise [37]
  • perfume sprays [38]
  • perfumes [39]
  • photos or pictures[40]
  • ping pong racket [41]
  • plastic tarp or sheet [42]
  • racquetball racket [43]
  • safety pin [44]
  • salt shaker (even if it has rice in it) [45]
  • telescopes [46]
  • tennis racket [47]
  • thermos [48]
  • toothpick [49]
  • toy phone as long as it’s moved without it making noise [50]
  • talking doll as long as it’s moved without it making noise [51]
  • water used for Netilat Yadayim and Mayim Achronim [52]
  • wind-up toy [53]
  • whistle as long as it’s moved without it making noise [54]
  • wrist watch (mechanical [55] or electric [56]) as long as it works [57]
  1. A utensil designated to be used for pikuach nefesh is considered kli shemelachto lheter.[58] Others consider it kli shemelachto lisur.[59]
  2. Any book that is forbidden to read according to some is a kli shemelachto lisur and others hold it is muktzeh.[60] Some hold that they aren't muktzeh at all.[61]

Items that are entirely excluded from Muktzeh

Definition

  1. Certain items that Chazal excluded from the laws of Muktzeh altogether are non-Muktzeh. [62]

Rules

  1. It’s permissible to move or touch a non-Muktzeh item even for no purpose at all. [63]

Examples

  • Food and drinks [64]
  • Food utensils including dishes, glasses, and silverware [65]
  • Sefarim (holy books which are permissible to read) [66]
  • Some authorities permit reading books of wisdom and medicine, so they are not muktze. [67]

Further examples

  1. Some consider the following to be exceptions to muktzeh just like the above examples.
  • chairs that will be used for sitting [68]
  • clothing that will be used on Shabbat [69]
  • empty bottles for drinks [70]
  • keys to the house [71]
  • serving utensils [72]
  • tablecloth [73]
  • Tallit bag [74]
  • Medicine that is found in the house, which is permissible for a choleh she'en bo sakana, is not muktze and may be moved from sun to shade. [75]

Animal Food

  1. Animal food isn’t muktzeh if the animals common in that place would eat it. Animals that only rich people own as pets doesn’t make food that they eat to be non-muktzeh.[76]
  2. If there are animals common in another place nearby neighborhood some poskim say that it makes it non-muktzeh for the nearby area[77], while others hold it depends on your neighborhood where you would walk.[78]
  3. We only consider animals which are common in that place and it doesn’t matter what’s common in the world.[79]
  4. Some say that we only consider pets[80] and others argue that we consider any animal that is common in that town even non-pets.[81]

Leftover Foods

  1. If a person is eating fruit or nuts and has spits or shells in his mouth that aren’t edible to humans or people some poskim hold that one should spit it out on the plate, while others hold that one can use one’s hands to take the pits and place them on the plate.[82]
  2. Leftover food that is edible to animals in your place isn't muktzeh.[83] What animals are considered for this see #Animal Food.
  3. Leftover food that isn't edible that is upon one's plate one could shake it off the plate since it didn't become a bosis.[84]
  4. Fruit pits that one is eating and the pit which is left is muktzeh some say that one can place them on the plate while others say that they should be dropped.[85]

Sources

  1. see further; Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 18)
  2. S”A 308:2, Mishna Brurah 308:8
  3. Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 1; S”A 308:4 rules that a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter may be moved even for purposes that serve the vessel itself such as to prevent it from breaking or being stolen. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 18) explains that this type of purposes includes any purpose for the movement (as is evident by the inverse case). However, concludes S”A, it’s forbidden to move Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter for no purpose. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 85:8 agrees. The gemara (Shabbos 123b) quotes a tosefta discussing the historical development of the prohibition of tiltul keilim. The gemara explains that virtually all keilim were included in the initial prohibition and these keilim could not be moved even litzorech gufo or litzorech mikomo. However, as time went on, chazal ultimately permitted movement of a kli shemilachto li’isur litzorech gufo or litzorech mikomo and a kli shemilachto liheter even meichama l’tzeil (see gemara there for a dissenting opinion not accepted lihalacha.)
    The Beis Yosef (308:4) quotes the Maggid Mishna (shabbos 25:3) who infers from the Rambam that while a kli shemilachto liheter is the most lenient type of kli, it may not be moved shelo ltzarich klal. The Maggid Mishna explains that this emerges from the gemara, as the gemara’s phraseology “meichama ltzeil” seems to limit the permissibility to cases that protect the item.
    A further proof that a kli shemilachto liheter cannot be moved shelo litzorech klal is brought from the gemara’s conclusion on 124a that the shelves containing the lechem hapanim could not be moved in order to freshen the bread since the bread will not become stale in the interim if these shelves are not handled. This indicates that one needs a sufficient tzorech in order to move a kli shemilachto liheter (see Chiddushei haRan 124a and Ridvaz on Rambam Tmidim Umusafim 5:11.) Shitah Lran 123b s.v. mah li and 126b s.v. ki are lenient to move a kli shemelachto lheter for no purpose. Ran meyuchas Lritva 123b and Ritva 123b forbid it.
    The Mishna Brurah 308:23 records a lenient opinion that allows the movement of silverware and the like which are constantly handled, as these keilim were never included in the prohibition of tiltul keilim. This leniency is based on Tosfos 123b d’h miktzoa who considers it untenable that chazal would have ever prohibited moving such everyday items. The Mishna Brurah admits that the Rambam seems to prohibit even such movement (see Shaar Hatzion 21.)
    The Dirshu Mishna Brurah’s footnote 29 quotes some poskim who permit those who move items out of nervous habit or to help concentrate while learning to do so on Shabbos, as this is considered a tzorech. See also Aruch Hashulchan 308:15 who rules that any movement which a person performs intentionally must have some purpose and is therefore permitted.
  4. Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 22
  5. Shulchan Aruch O.C. 308:4, Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 1
  6. Aruch HaShulchan 308:15 writes that moving a kli shemelachto lheter for pleasure is permitted since that is considered a use. Also, Minchat Shabbat 88:53 says that Kli Sh'Melachto LeHeter may be moved if there's pleasure in moving it. Chazon Ovadyah (vol 3, pg 7) relies on this in regards to silverware where there's another dispute if it's considered like food or like Kli SheMelachto LeHeter. See also Avnei Nezer OC 403. However, Ben Ish Chai Miketz n. 1 writes that one should move silverware on the table from place to place for no reason just because someone’s hands are fidgety. Also, Yalkut Yosef (Shabbat vol 2 pg 457, Sherit Yosef pg 418) was strict regarding silverware for no purpose.
  7. Rav Nevinsal in Byitzchak Yikareh 308:4 quoting Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach
  8. Aruch HaShulchan 308:15, Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 18)
  9. Taz 308:2, Mishna Brurah 308:21
  10. Why was moving the reeds on the Shulchan an issue? Ritva and Tosfot Harosh say that it is only an issue according to Rabba who says that moving something for the protection of the utensil isn’t enough and we don’t follow his opinion. Ran Meyuchas Lritva writes that it is because it is shelo ltzorech klal since it could be avoided by arranging it before and after Shabbat. Birkat Tzvi Shabbat p. 333 quotes Rav Yisrael Schwartz that according to the Meyuchas LRitva you should set the table before Shabbat otherwise it is considered shelo ltzorech klal to do something on Shabbat that you could have done on Shabbat. He writes that he didn’t see the poskim write this. This assumes that silverware and the like shouldn’t be moved for no reason; see Mishna Brurah 308:23.
  11. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 30)
  12. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 28:54
  13. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 31)
  14. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein, however, Shalmei Yehuda (pg 91) in name of Rav Elyashiv considers this Kli SheMelachto LeIssur
  15. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  16. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 28) considers binoculars Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter
  17. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 33)
  18. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 24) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein since they are designated for children’s use and other permitted uses. So agrees Shalmei Yehuda (pg 90) as long as the blocks don’t connect they are considered Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter.
  19. S”A 307:17 writes that it’s forbidden to learn secular wisdom on Shabbat and some permit. Mishna Brurah 307:65 comments that the minhag is to be lenient. Regarding Muktzeh 308:50 writes that some say it’s not Muktzeh and some say it may be Muktzeh. Mishna Brurah 308:164 writes that the Gra holds that both opinions would be lenient and also references his comment in 307. Hacham Ovadia Yosef (Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 31) differentiates between books of wisdom and medicine versus history books. He maintains that the former is not muktze at all because some say that they are permissible to read on Shabbat but the latter is muktze because they are not permissible to read on Shabbat.
  20. S”A 308:49 writes that a broom isn’t Muktzeh, however, Mishna Brurah 308:168 writes that it’s considered Kli Sh’Melachto LeIssur because one may not use a broom on Shabbat even on a tiled floor. Nowadays, however, Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (Rav Bodner pg 29) considers brooms which have bristles that do not break to be Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter since it’s permitted to broom a tiled floor where most of the homes of the city have tiled floors (Beiur Halacha 337:2 s.v. VeYesh; Sefer Hilchot Shabbat (vol 2 pg 51, Choresh note 115, by Rabbi Eider) in name of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes that nowadays it’s permissible to use a broom on ground with flooring.)
  21. Shalmei Yehuda (pg 91) in name of Rav Elyashiv, Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 27).
  22. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 30)
  23. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 55 in the footnote)
  24. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 43 note 25(3)) quotes Kesot HaShulchan (Badei HaShulchan 108:12) who rules that if a pot is designated for both serving and cooking even if it’s mostly used for cooking it’s considered a Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter.
  25. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 43-4) rules that a pot that’s designated for serving and cooking but is used primarily for serving is certainly considered Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter.
  26. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 31)
  27. Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata ch. 20 fnt. 28 suggests that wearing a gun to scare of criminals is tzorech gufo and if that is the majority use it would be melachto lheter. Otherwise he implies it is melachto lheter. Orchot Shabbat 19:62 writes that in fact a gun that is mostly used to scare people is considered kli shemelachto lheter and even when it is used to shoot it is pikuach nefesh. But in America a gun is muktzeh machmat chisaron kis since they're dangerous and usually locked away. However, Shalmei Yohatan Muktzeh v. 1 p. 329 argues that a gun is a kli shemelachto lisur since it is used for melacha even though it is used for pikuach nefesh which is permitted. His proof is a milah knife which is kli shemelachto lisur (Pri Megadim M"Z 308:2). See Chazon Ish 49:9 as a proof for this.
  28. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 30)
  29. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  30. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 109), Shalmei Yehuda (pg 179) in name of Rav Elyashiv who explained that it’s permissible to spray on Shabbat
  31. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 20:16
  32. Mishna Brurah 308:78, Shalmei Yehuda 11:4 p. 180 quoting Rav Elyashiv, Minchat Ish p. 173 n. 391, Nishmat Shabbat 3:2:369. Even though the Rambam 26:7 writes that a ladder is muktzeh because it services a house (Levushei Sarad 308:46) and isn't considered a utensil an indoor ladder that is moved around in the house even the Rambam would agree is a utensil (Nishmat Shabbat). Also, Biur Halacha 308:9 points out that the Tur and Gra disagree with the Rambam altogether. Shalmei Yehuda quotes Rav Elyashiv that a ladder isn't a kli shemelachto lisur since it is sometimes used for permitted uses as well.
  33. Tiltulei Shabbat (p. 83) writes that any liquid soap which is permitted to use on Shabbat isn't muktzeh.
  34. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 32). see more at Magnets
  35. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 28) considers marbles Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter
  36. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 28) considers microscopes Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter
  37. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  38. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 30)
  39. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 31)
  40. Shalmei Yehuda 3:14 quoting Rav Elyashiv
  41. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  42. Sh"t Igrot Moshe 5:39(4) writes that it's permissible to cover the Sukkah with a plastic sheet on Shabbat and Yom Tov without an issue of Boneh by making an Ohel nor the issue of muktzah.
  43. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  44. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 31)
  45. Shalmei Yehuda 6:5 writes that according to those who permit (oral ruling from Rav Elyashiv, Az Nidbaru 2:14, 4:23, Yalkut Yosef Shabbat vol 3 pg 307) having dry rice in the salt shaker and don’t consider it Muktzeh there’s no question that the shaker isn’t Muktzeh. However, says the Shalmei Yehuda, even according to those who forbid (Rav Moshe Feinstein quoted in Hilchot Shabbat by Rabbi Eider, Melachat Borer note 103, Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 3:60) who forbids will agree that it’s not Muktzeh since it can be used without rice.
  46. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 28) considers telescopes Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter
  47. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  48. Shalmei Yehuda 6:4 writes that a thermos isn’t Muktzeh since many (Chazon Ish 37:35, Az Nidbaru 1:48-9, 3:17, Igrot Moshe 1:95, oral ruling from Rav Elyashiv) permit pouring hot water from a Kli RIshon in there and it’s not hatmana. [However, according to Sh”t Shevet HaLevi 1:93 that it’s forbidden to put hot water into a thermos, thermos should be considered a Kli Sh’Melachto LeIssur.]
  49. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 32)
  50. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  51. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein
  52. Beiur Halacha 338:8 s.v. Asur writes that water used for Netilat Yadayim and Mayim Achronim isn’t Muktzeh. Rav Pinchas Sheinburg (his Kuntres on Muktzah in Shalmei Yehuda (pg 264-5) agrees with Beiur Halacha. However, Rav Binyamin Zilber in Brit Olam (pg 111 #30) and Sh”t Az Nidbaru 1:79(179) argues that it should be considered Muktzeh.
  53. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 28) quoting Rav Moshe Feinstein considers wind-up toys Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter by reasoning that even though it’s forbidden to wind up a toy the toy is not Muktzeh since they’re designated for little kids.
  54. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 26) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein, however, Shalmei Yehuda (pg 91) in name of Rav Elyashiv considers this Kli SheMelachto LeIssur
  55. Mishna Brurah 308:168 writes that mechanical wrist and pocket watches are non-Muktzeh. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 20 writes that a self-winding watch is also non-Muktzeh.
  56. Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 20-21) in name of Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that electric wrist watches are non-Muktzeh and one doesn’t need to cover the buttons unless one feels that one will hit a button. Menuchat Ahava 12:3 holds that one should be strict not to move an electric watch on Shabbat but the strict law is that it’s permissible.
  57. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 28:25 and Rav Elyashiv quoted by Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 21) consider non-working watches to be Muktzeh, however, Kaf HaChaim 308:277 quoted by Sefer Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 21) and Yalkut Yosef (Kitzur S”A 308) write that for a person who would wear the watch as jewelry and wear it even if it wasn’t working, the watch is considered non-muktzah
  58. Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata ch. 20 fnt. 28 implies guns are kli shemelachto lisur. Orchot Shabbat 2:19:62 p. 33 writes that guns are kli shemelchto lheter since they’re used to scare people or to shoot for pikuach nefesh. Peninei Halacha Shabbat Harchavot 7:11 p. 528 writes this as a general rule that utensils for pikuach nefesh are kli shemelachto lheter and cites Rav Goren for this ruling.
  59. Ayala Shelucha Muktzeh p. 168 writes that items that are used for melacha even though they are a mitzvah are nonetheless considered a kli shemelachto lisur. His proof is a milah knife that is considered melachto lisur and additionally muktzeh machmat chisaron kis even though they’re used for a mitzvah of milah.
    • See further in Meiri Beitzah 28b that a spit used on yom tov is melachto lisur. See however Rabbi Akiva Eiger beitzah 2b that a shechita knife on yom tov is melachto lheter. See also Biur Halacha 518 s.v. v'im.
  60. Shulchan Aruch O.C. 308:50 has a doubt within the Rambam that it is forbidden to read science books on Shabbat if they’re muktzeh. Gra argues that it is certainly only a kli shemelachto lisur since they could be read during the week. Mishna Brurah 308:164 cites the Gra.
  61. Shulchan Aruch 308:50 citing the Rashba, Mishna Brurah 308:164 citing the Gra
  62. see further; Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 19)
  63. S”A 308:4 rules that holy books and food may be moved for no purpose at all as they weren’t included in the gezerah of Muktzeh at all. Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 18)
  64. S”A 308:4; Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 9; Hacham Ovadia (Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 22) writes that foods which are prohibited to eat on shabbat are also prohibited to handle (tiltul).
  65. Mishna Brurah 308:23 rules that food utensils may be moved even for no purpose at all even though some authorities hold that food utensils are considered Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter and not non-Muktzeh. [Since the language of Mishna Brurah is the utensils that are on the table and used often aren’t Muktzeh seemingly including serving utensils.] This is also the opinion of Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 19) (with the language of many authorities versus some authorities). Menuchat Ahava 12:2 rules leniently but adds that it's preferable to be strict.
  66. S”A 308:4 writes that Kitvei Kodesh, holy books, are non-Muktzeh. Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 9 quotes this Halacha. Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 85:8 agrees. Mishna Brurah 308:22 adds that the Pri Megadim and Eliyah Rabba consider a megillah in this category even though the Pri Chadash 688:6 considers it Muktzeh (See Sharei Teshuva 308:2). The Tiltulei Shabbat (pg 32) also rules leniently.
  67. Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 31
  68. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1
  69. Shalmei Yehuda 4:1 writes that clothing that will be used on Shabbat is considered non-Muktzeh according to all, while clothing that won’t be used on Shabbat, some consider it non-Muktzeh while others consider it Kli Sh’Melachto LeHeter. Rav Elyashiv is quoted in Shvut Yitzchak v. 1 p. 85 that clothing is like food and isn’t muktzeh at all. He explained that it is different than utensils since those only enable you to function while clothing directly benefit you. Shemirat Shabbat KeHilchata 20:83 rules like the Kesot HaShulchan (Badei HaShulchan 108:7) who holds that clothing are considered non-muktzah like food. Nachalat Yisrael 1:7 (pg 3), Mechaze Eliyahu 45, and Shevut Yitzchak (Muktzah pg 85) quoting Rav Elayshiv agree. Yalkut Yosef (vol 2, pg 463) is also lenient regarding clothing. See also Meiri 124b s.v. Kli (quoted by Nachalat Yisrael by 140) who considers clothes as a Kli SheMelacha LeHeter.
  70. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1
  71. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1
  72. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1 writes in the name of Rav Elyashiv and another Talmid Chacham that the exception from the laws of Muktzeh includes anything that’s always used on Shabbat such as a chair, a house key, tablecloth, empty bottle, Tallit bag. If so, certainly serving utensils are also included.
  73. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1
  74. Shalmei Yehuda 6:1
  75. Chazon Ovadia, Hilchot Shabbat, Chelek 3, Page 19, and an example given is aspirin
  76. Gemara Shabbat 128a, Rambam Shabbat 26:16, Shulchan Aruch O.C. 308:29
  77. Chazon Ovadia v. 3 p. 23
  78. Or Letzion v. 2 p. 216 writes that it depends on where you would walk but not from one end of the city of a city to the other.
  79. Shalmei Yonatan Muktzeh v. 1 p. 241 writes you need it to be common in that place and not just in the world. This might depend on the ran and rosh as the Pri Megadim 308:55 writes. However, the Drisha 308:12 cites the Rosh in full and it is evident that there’s no dispute. Either way, the Ran is codified by Shulchan Aruch 308:29 that you need matzuy in your place.
  80. Shalmei Yehuda p. 111 cites Rav Elyashiv holding this opinion since it is forbidden to fed animals which aren’t pets besides for dogs. Tehilah Ldovid and Chut Shani cited by Dirshu.
  81. Shalmei Yehuda p. 333 n. 33 cites a letter from Rav Pinchas Sheinberg that it doesn’t depend on only pets. His proof is that the poskim didn’t specify only pets but rather wrote any common animal. Also, it is sometimes permitted to feed non-pets if they rely on you for sustenance like ownerless dogs (Magen Avraham 324:7). Rav Yakov Yisrael Fisher (Meor Hashabbat v. 1 p. 547, cited by Chazon Ovadia) writes that animal food isn’t muktzeh if animals of that area would eat it even if it is forbidden to feed the animals which aren’t pets. Chazon Ovadia v. 3 p. 24 agrees.
  82. Gemara Shabbat 143a cites several alternatives of how to get rid of seeds and pits while one is eating fruits. Rav Sheshet used to spit them out to a place of garbage and it isn’t clear if the others did the same or not. See Meyuchas Lran 143a s.v. hani who implies that it is permitted to place it down after eating. Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata 20:26 rules that it is permitted to take the muktzeh pits or shells from one’s mouth and place them on the plate. Orchot Shabbat v. 2 p. 82 explains that the reason is that the pits or seeds aren’t muktzeh since they are nullified by the food. Furthermore, to place it on the plate and not to drop it immediately it is relevant to the discussion of the Magen Avraham 266:12 and Even Haozer 266. However, Shulchan Aruch Harav 308:67 explicitly writes that one may not take it in one's hands. Orchot Shabbat cites many including Tehilah Ldovid, Aruch Moshe, Igrot Moshe, and Chazon Ish who held that you can’t take the muktzeh in your hands, rather you have to spit it out. This is also implied by Magen Avraham 308:50 and Mishna Brurah 308:124. Rav Shlomo Zalman is quoted in contradictory ways.
  83. Beitzah 2a, Shabbat 143a, Shulchan Aruch O.C. 308:26
  84. Beitzah 2a, Shabbat 143a, Shulchan Aruch O.C. 308:26. The reason that it didn't become a bosis is because one planned to remove them before the end of Shabbat (Tosfot Beitzah 2a), there is also permitted food on the table (Tosfot), it was left in a haphazard manner and not placed (Tosfot), it wasn't there from the beginning of Shabbat (Baal Hameor), or it isn't significant compared to what is holding it (Rashba Beitzah 2a s.v. mistabra). This is all quoted by the Magen Avraham 308:50.
  85. Orchot Shabbat 19:212 and 356 based on Magen Avraham and Even Haozer end of 266