Template:How Long Does One Have to Recite Birkat Hamazon

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  1. If one ate bread and is full, preferably one should make Birkat Hamazon within 72 minutes and after the fact, one may make it as long as one is full from what one ate. However, after 72 minutes, if one is a little hungry, one can no longer make the Birkat Hamazon. [1]
  2. If it’s past 72 minutes and one is in doubt whether one is still full one can make Birkat Hamazon, yet, it’s preferable to eat another Kezayit before making Birkat Hamazon. [2]
  3. However, if one just had a Kezayit and was not full, one should try to make the Birkat Hamazon right away and if one didn't one may only make Birkat Hamazon up to 72 minutes after one ate. [3] Some add that if one waited more than a half hour it's preferable to have another Kezayit of bread before making Birkat Hamazon. [4]
  4. If one has a very long meal and continues to have appetizers or drinks, one may make the Birkat Hamazon as long as the meal continues even 4 or 5 hours. [5] One should have something to eat or drink every 72 minutes, however, if one didn't then one may still say Birkat Hamazon. [6]
    1. If someone was at a wedding and ate the main course and danced for a while the time lapse before it is too late to say birkat hamazon can be extended by eating or drinking something. [7]
    2. Shulchan Aruch OC 184:5 writes that one may Birkat Hamazon until one is hungry again. Vezot HaBracha (pg 49, chapter 5) and Yalkut Yosef (Brachot pg 300) rule that if one didn’t make Birkat Hamazon until after 72 minutes, one may surely recite Birkat Hamazon as long as one is still full and one isn't hungry. Vezot HaBracha quotes Rav Elyashiv who says that it’s preferable to eat a little more before making Birkat Hamazon. Aruch HaShulchan 184:7 and 8 writes that since we don't know the precise determination of when we're still full must make Birkat Hamazon within 72 minutes and if one didn't then one should eat another Kezayit and then say Birkat Hamazon. Kaf HaChaim 184:28 writes that in order to fulfill all opinions if it has been 72 minutes one should eat another Kezayit and if one doesn't have bread one may make Birkat Hamazon as long as one is full.
    3. Mishna Brurah 184:15, Vezot HaBracha (pg 49, chapter 5)
    4. Yalkut Yosef (Brachot pg 300), Mishna Brurah 184:20
    5. Vezot HaBracha (chap 5, pg 50)
    6. Mishna Brurah 184:18, Vezot HaBracha (chap 5, pg 50), Yalkut Yosef (Brachot pg 301)
    7. Vezot HaBracha (chap 5, pg 51) quoting the Magen Avraham 184:9
    8. Vezot Habracha p. 249 quotes Teshuvot Vehanhagot 1:175 as saying that flavored water can extend this time period. See Har Tzvi 96 and Shevet Halevi 6:27.

    Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef (b. 1952), sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel, son of Rav Ovadia Yosef and brother of Rabbi David Yosef, is the author of Yalkut Yosef, which is a encyclopedic work of Sephardic halacha.

    Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan (1838 – 1933), known popularly as The Chofetz Chaim from his book on the laws of Lashon Hara, was an influential Lithuanian Rabbi, author of the Mishna Brurah as well as the Beur Halacha which is in more detail and the Shaar Hatziyun which quotes sources

    Rabbi Avraham Gombiner Halevi (1637-1683), Rav in poland, author of Magen Avraham on SA OC.