Brachot On Foods That Start With The Letter C

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Foods that start with the letter C

Food Bracha Rishona Bracha Achrona
Cabbage Soup HaAdama Borei Nefashos[1]
Cake (Excluding Nut Cake)
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[2]
Calf foot jelly (petcha) Shehakol Borei Nefeashos[3]
Calzone
If dough is made with a lot of oil (common) Mezonot Al Hamichya
If dough is made without a lot of oil
   Small Piece As A Snack - Customarily Mezonot Al Hamichya
   If Eaten As Or With A Meal HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[4]
Cantaloupe HaAdama Borei Nefashos[5]
Caramel Shehakol Borei Nefashos[6]
Carob HaEtz Borei Nefashos[7]
Carob Cake Mezonot Al Hamichya[8]
Carrot HaAdama Borei Nefashos[9]
Carrot Cake
  With Flour
    Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
    With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon
  Without Flour  Shehakol Borei Nefashos[10]
Carrot Juice Shehakol Borei Nefashos[11]
Carrot raisin salad HaAdama Borei Nefashos[12]
Carrot tzimmis HaAdama Borei Nefashos[13]
Casaba melon HaAdama Borei Nefashos[14]
Cashew Nut HaEtz Borei Nefashos[15]
Casserole
With noodles Mezonot Al Hamichya
With pie crust Mezonot Borei Nefashos[16]
For other types See Ikar and Tofel
Cauliflower Haadama Boreh Nefashot[17]
Celery HaAdama Borei Nefashos[18]
Celery Soda Shehakol Borei Nefashos[19]
Celery Soup HaAdama Borei Nefashos[20]
Cereal, Dry Beracha Of Cereal Only [21]
Challah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[22]
Challah Kugel Mezonot Al Hamichya[23]
Champagne Hagofen Al Ha'gefen[24]
Cherrios
Original, Apple Cinnamon, Frosted, Honey Nut, Multigrain, Oat Cluster Crunch, Yogurt Burst Mezonot Al Hamichya[25]
Cinnamon Burst, Fruity, Banana Nut, Chocolate Shehakol Borei Nefashos[26]
Cheese Shehakol Borei Nefashos[27]
Cheese Blintzes Mezonot Al Hamichya[28]
Cheese Cake Many say: Mezonot Borei Nefashos
Some say:Shehakol Borei Nefashos[29]
Cheese Danish
  Without Kvias Sudah  Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[30]
Cherry HaEtz Borei Nefashos[31]
Cherry Cake
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[32]
Cherry Danish Mezonot Al Hamichya[33]
Cherry Pie
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[34]
Cherry Wine Shehakol No Bracha[35]
Chestnut
Roasted HaEtz Borei Nefashos
Raw Shehakol Borei Nefashos[36]"
Chewing Gum Shehakol No Bracha[37]
Chicken Shehakol Borei Nefashos[38]
Chicken, Breaded See Breaded Chicken
Chicken Chow Mein (noodles cooked in)
  Made with chicken and vegetables
    If The Majority Is Chicken Shehakol Borei Nefashos
    If The Majority Is Vegetables HaAdama Borei Nefashos[39]
  Made with chicken, vegetables, and rice
    If The Majority Is Chicken Shehakol Borei Nefashos
    If The Majority Is Vegetables HaAdama Borei Nefashos
If The Majority Is Rice Mezonot Borei Nefashos[40]
  Made with chicken, vegetables, and noodles
If noodles are mixed in completely Mezonot Al Ha'michya[41]
If noodles are not mixed in
     On Noodles Mezonot Al Ha'michya
     On Chow Mein (Mostly Chicken) Shehakol Borei Nefashos
     On Chow Mein (Mostly Vegetable) HaAdama Borei Nefashos[42]
Chicken Fricassee Shehakol Borei Nefashos[43]
Chicken Salad
  If The Majority Is Chicken Shehakol Borei Nefashos
  If The Majority Is Vegetable HaAdama Borei Nefashos[44]
Chicken Soup
  Significant amount of noodles Mezonot Al Hamichya[45]
  With small amount of noodles, dumplings, or soup nuts
    On Soup Shehakol No Bracha
    On Noodles Mezonot Al Hamichya[46]
  Broth with small vegetables Shehakol Borei Nefashos[47]
  With Larger Pieces Of Celery Or Carrot
    On Celery/Carrot HaAdama Borei Nefashos
    On Soup Shehakol No Bracha[48]
Chicken With Stuffing
  On Bread Stuffing Mezonot Al Hamichya
  On Rice Stuffing Mezonot Borei Nefashos
  On Chicken Shehakol  *16 Borei Nefashos[49]
Chickpeas HaAdama Borei Nefashos[50]
Chicory HaAdama No Bracha[51]
Chinese Noodles Mezonot Al Hamichya[52]
Chives Shehakol No Bracha[53]
Chocolate Shehakol Borei Nefashos[54]
Chocolate Bar With Almonds Shehakol Borei Nefashos[55]
Chocolate Cake
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[56]
Chocolate-covered fruit or nut
  If one's primary intent is for the fruit or nut Bracha of nut or fruit Borei Nefashos
  If one's primary intent is for the chocolate Shehakol Borei Nefashos[57]
Chocolate Covered Matzah Hamotzei Birkat Hamazon[58]   Coconut Bar HaEtz Borei Nefashos[59]
Chocolate Eclair
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[60]
Chocolate Fudge Shehakol Borei Nefashos[61]
Chocolate Milk Shehakol Borei Nefashos[62]
Chocolate Mousse Shehakol Borei Nefashos[63]
Chocolate Pudding Shehakol Borei Nefashos[64]
Chocolate Yeast Cake (Kokosh)
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[65]
Chopped Liver Shehakol Borei Nefashos[66]
Chow Mein
  Made with Chicken See "Chicken Chow Mein"
  Made with Rice and Vegetables
    If Rice Is In Majority Mezonot Borei Nefashos
    If Vegetables Are In Majority HaAdama Borei Nefashos[67]
  Made with rice, vegetables, and noodles (assuming noodles are not cooked together with other ingredients)
    If Noodles Are In Majority Mezonot Al Hamichya[68]
    If Vegetables Are In Majority
      On Noodles Mezonot Al Hamichya
      On Vegetables HaAdama Borei Nefashos[69]
Chulent (with barley)
  With Small Pieces Of Potatoes Or Meat Mezonot Al Hamichya[70]
  With Large Pieces Of Potatoes
    On Barley Mezonot Al Hamichya
    On Potatoes HaAdama  *19 Borei Nefashos[71]
  With Large Pieces Of Meat
    On Barley Mezonot Al Hamichya
    On Meat Shehakol  *19 Borei Nefashos[72]
Chluent (without barley)
  Without Kishke HaAdama Borei Nefashos[73]
  With Kishke
    On Kishke Mezonot Al Hamichya
    On Chulent HaAdama Borei Nefashos[74]
Chummous Shehakol Borei Nefashos[75]
Cider Shehakol Borei Nefashos[76]
Cinnamon (With Sugar) Some say: Shehakol No Bracha
Some say: HaAdama No Bracha [77]
Cinnamon Roll
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[78]
Cinnamon Toast Crunch (Cereal) Mezonot Al Hamichya[79]
Cocoa Shehakol Borei Nefashos[80]
Cocoa Pebbles (Cereal) Mezonot Borei Nefashos[81]
Cocoa Powder (Unsweetened) No Bracha [82]
Cocoa Puffs (Cereal) Shehakol Borei Nefashos[83]
Coconut (Including Shredded) HaEtz Borei Nefashos[84]
Coconut Milk Shehakol Borei Nefashos[85]
Coffee Shehakol No Bracha Achrona *(see note)[86]
Coffee Cake
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[87]
Cognac Shehakol No Bracha  *3[88]
Coleslaw HaAdama Borei Nefashos[89]
Cooked Grains (5 Species)
  If The Grains Are Complete HaAdama Borei Nefashos[90]
  If The Grains Are Incomplete Mezonot Al Hamichya[91]
  If The Grains Are Cooked Thoroughly and Look Mashed Mezonot Al Hamichya[92]
Cookies
  Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
  With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[93]
Cookie Dough (Raw) Shehakol Borei Nefashos[94]
Corn (Niblets Or On The Cob) HaAdama Borei Nefashos[95]
Corn Bread
  With Grain Flour
    Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
    With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[96]
  Without Grain Flour Shehakol Borei Nefashos[97]
Corn Chex (Cereal) Shehakol Borei Nefashos[98]
Corn Chips Shehakol Borei Nefashos[99]
Corn Flakes
  Produced From Flattened Corn Kernels (Conventional) HaAdama Borei Nefashos[100]
  Produced From Corn Flour Shehakol Borei Nefashos[101]
Corn Fritters Shehakol  (Explanation) Borei Nefashos[102]
Corn Muffin
  With Grain Flour
    Without Kvias Sudah Mezonot Al Hamichya
    With Kvias Sudah HaMotzei Bircas Hamazon[103]
  Without Grain Flour Shehakol Borei Nefashos[104]
Corn Pops (Cereal) HaAdama Borei Nefashos[105]
Crunchy Covered Peanuts (בוטנים אמריקאים) Mezonot Al Hamichya[106]

Sources

  1. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, chap 11, pg 332) writes that cabbage soup is HaAdama even if one doesn't even any pieces of cabbage. However, Halachos of Brachos (chap 23, pg 438) says that cabbage soup with pieces of cabbage is certainly HaAdama, but if one is only having the liquid without the cabbage there is a doubt whether the Bracha is HaAdama or Shehakol.
  2. S"A 168:6 rules that when one eats Pas HaBa BeKisnin as a snack the Bracha Rishona is Mezonot and Bracha Achrona is Al HaMichya, however, if one eats the amount of a meal the bracha is HaMotzei and Birkat HaMazon. See further Making a meal on Mezonot. S"A 168:7 gives three definitions of Pas Haba BeKisnin and the second one is dough which was kneaded with sweeteners such as honey, oil, or milk to the point that the taste of the sweeteners is recognizable in the cake. However, the Rama argues that it's not Mezonot unless there is a significant amount of sweeteners added. The Mishna Brurah 168:33 explains that according to the S"A the taste of the sweetener must be recognizable in the dough and the Rama holds that it must be the majority in comparison to the flour and also must have a strong taste that's recognizable. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, chap 8, pg 237) writes that certainly chocolate cake, coffee cake, and honey cake certainly would fit this category and on pg 361 he writes that in general cakes besides nut cake are Mezonot unless one ate the amount of a normal meal in which case one would have to make HaMotzei. Halachos of Brachos (chap 27, pg 52) and Vezot HaBracha (pg 394) agree.
  3. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 19) (based on S"A 24:1)
  4. S"A 168:7 rules that when one eats Pas HaBa BeKisnin as a snack the Bracha Rishona is Mezonot and Bracha Achrona is Al HaMichya, however, if one makes a meal out of it the bracha is HaMotzei and Birkat HaMazon. S"A 168:8 gives three definitions of Pas Haba BeKisnin, the first is dough in which stuffed with a pocket of honey or nuts, and the second one is dough which was kneaded with sweeteners such as honey, oil, or milk. The Taz 168:2 writes that dough which was made with a pocket of meat or cheese is also Pas HaBa BeKisnin, while the Magan Avraham 168:44 argues that specifically a pocket of a dessert like food qualifies the whole dough as Pas HaBa BeKisnin, but a pocket of something which is a meal type food such as meat or cheese the bracha would be Hamotzei like bread. The Mishna Brurah 168:94 rules that if there is a pocket of meat or cheese the bracha would be Hamotzei because it's meant to be a meal type food, however, if it's clearly only eaten as a snack the bracha would be Mezonot like Pas Haba BeKisnin. Therefore, Laws of Brachos (chap 8, pg 235) writes that the bracha on calzone is difficult to determine and on pg 361 concludes that if one eats a small piece of calzone as a snack the bracha is Mezonot and if it is eaten as or with a meal the bracha is HaMotzei. However, the Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 19) writes that the bracha is Mezonot and on pg 494 he explains that it is Mezonot because it is commonly made with a lot of oil and fits the first definition of Pas Haba BeKisnin.
  5. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 396)
  6. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 455)
  7. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 396)
  8. Halachos of Brachos (pg 52) writes that carrot cake is made with flour as the main ingredient.
  9. [Yavetz (Siddur Tzedi no. 3)], Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 396)
  10. Halachos of Brachos (pg 52) writes that carrot cake is made with flour as the main ingredient. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) agrees but adds that if there is no flour the Bracha is Shehakol.
  11. S"A 25:3, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 431)
  12. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 2) writes that the salad is primary and the carrots only enhance it so the Bracha is HaAdama for the salad.
  13. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 2) writes that the carrots are primary even if prunes are mixed in.
  14. Halachos of Brachos (pg 396)
  15. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 396), Yalkut Yosef 204:15
  16. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  17. The Laws of Brachot (p. 362), Halachos of Brachos (chap 22, pg 396)
  18. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (chap 22, pg 396)
  19. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 21)
  20. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  21. If there is a normal amount of milk one only makes a Bracha on the cereal, however, in the event that one is interested in drinking the milk one should make two Brachot one on the cereal and one on the milk. See Ikar_and_Tofel#cite_ref-52.
  22. Challah is braided bread usually eaten on Shabbat and Yom Tov. The Mishna in Gemara Brachot 35a writes that the Bracha on bread is HaMotzei. This is codified by the Rambam (Brachot 3:2) and S"A 167:2. Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes challah is Hamotzei.
    • Challah Kugel is a type of bread pudding using pieces of challah as the base of the recipe. Vezot HaBracha (chap 3, pg 25) writes that if the challah kugel is made with pieces smaller than a Kezayit which were kneaded together and mixed so that they aren't recognizable as bread and then it was baked in the oven, then a)if it was only kneaded with water, it's hamotzei, b)if it was kneaded with a little oil, honey, and sugar it's a doubt whether it's Hamotzei, c) if it was kneaded with a majority of oil, sugar, and juice in comparison to the water, then the bracha is Mezonot. He adds that according to Sephardim if the taste of the oil, juice, and sugar are recognizable even if it's less than majority it's mezonot.
    • Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that in general Challah Kugel is mezonot because the challah pieces are mixed with eggs, give it a taste other than bread, and are unrecognizable. However, he notes, if the pieces of bread are recognizable then the Bracha is Hamotzei.
    • Halachos of Brachos (chap 26, pg 474) quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ruling that challah kugel is mezonot and says that such is the minhag. He explains that since it’s mixed with a majority of eggs and oil it is considered mezonot (see Mishna Brurah 168:59).
  23. Champagne is a type of wine. Mishna Brachot 35a writes that the Bracha on wine is Hagafen. This is codified by the Rambam (Brachot 8:2) and S"A 22:1. Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that champagne is Hagofen.
  24. The first ingredient in cherrios is whole grain oats. Rav and Shmuel in Gemara Brachot 36b say that any food which has one fo the five grains has the bracha of Mezonot. This is codified by Rambam (Brachot 3:3) and S"A 28:2. It is generally assumed that oats is considered one of the five grains (Veten Bracha (Halachos of Brochos by Rabbi Bodner pg 48, chapter 27), Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, chap 8, pg 23), Vezot HaBracha (chap 12, pg 12)). Thus, Star-K on their list of Brachot on cereal for 212 write that the Original, Apple Cinnamon, Frosted, Honey Nut, Multigrain, Oat Cluster Crunch Cherrios are all Mezonot. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) agrees. Rabbi Hershel Schachter (min 79-82) fundamentally doesn't agree that oats are considered a grain, however, he concludes that since American oats (from which Cherrios are made) have a siginificant amount of gluten in them the correct bracha is mezonot.
  25. Star-K on their list of Brachot on cereal for 212 write that the Cinnamon Burst, Fruity, Banana Nut, and Chocolate Cherrios are all Shehakol (because these cereals aren't made with grain flour but primarily are made with corn flour).
  26. The Gemara Brachot 4b writes that foods which do not grow from the ground are Shehakol and one of the specific examples mentioned is cheese. This is codified by the Rambam (Brachot 8:1), S"A 24:1, and Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384).
  27. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 217) write that blintzes are mezonot. Halachos of Brachos (chap 27, pg 494) adds that it is Mezonot even if one eats the amount of a meal (Keviut Seudah).
    • In Gemara Brachot 36b, Rav and Shmuel say that anything which has (flour from) the five grains is mezonot. This is codified by Tur and S""A 28:2. Therefore, Vezot HaBracha (chap 11, pg 92) rules that if the cheese layer is baked together with the crust layer the Bracha is Mezonot. Similarly, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, chap 7, pg 219) writes in general the crust is used to add flavor and if so the Bracha is Mezonot, however if the crust is only meant to hold the cheese the Bracha is Shehakol. The OU agrees.
      • The second clause is based on the following: S”A 168:8 and 212:2 rules that if one eats jam/marmalade on a cracker one should only make a Bracha on the marmalade and it exempts the cracker. Mishna Brurah 168:45 explains that in the case of S”A one was only eating the jam on the cracker so as not to dirty one’s hands.
    • However, Halachos of Brachos (Rabbi Bodner, chap 4, pg 79) argues that in many cases the crust is only used to enhance the appearance of the cake and so the Bracha is Shehakol, however, if there is a thick layer he quotes Rav Moshe who says that the Bracha is Mezonot.
  28. A cheese danish is a sweet pastry filled with cheese. The Mishna Brurah 168:94 and Biur Halacha D"H Pashtida rules a compromise that if it's normal to eat the bread filled with meat to satisfy hunger and fill one up the bracha is Hamotzei, however, if there's pieces of meat mixed in and it's recognizable that it's meant as a dessert the bracha is Mezonot. It's clear from the S"A 168:17 there that the same applies to bread filled with cheese. For this and other reasons, the Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) rules that a cheese danish is Mezonot unless one has a Keviut Suedah in which case it's Hamotzei. Similarly, Halachos of Brachos (chap 27, pg 54) writes that pastries and strudels are mezonot unless one has a keviut sueda.
  29. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  30. Cherry cake is a cake filled with cherries and fits one of the definitons of Pas HaBah BeKisnin being filled with a sweetner(S"A 168:7). Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that cherry cake is Mezonot unless one has a Keviut Suedah.
  31. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 23) rules that a cherry danish is mezonot unless one has a keviut seudah.
  32. S"A 168:7 rules that when one eats Pas HaBa BeKisnin as a snack the Bracha Rishona is Mezonot and Bracha Achrona is Al HaMichya, however, if one makes a meal out of it the bracha is HaMotzei and Birkat HaMazon. S"A 168:8 gives three definitions of Pas Haba BeKisnin and the second one is dough which was kneaded with sweeteners such as honey, oil, or milk to the point that the taste of the sweeteners is recognizable in the cake. However, the Rama argues that it's not Mezonot unless there is a significant amount of sweeteners added. The Mishna Brurah 168:33 explains that according to the S"A the taste of the sweetener must be recognizable in the dough and the Rama holds that it must be the majority in comparison to the flour and also must have a strong taste that's recognizable. Therefore, Halachos of Brachos (chap 27, pg 54-5) writes that pies are mezonot and al hamichya if one eats a kezayit in a kedi achilat pras not including the fruit filling. Similarly, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 217) rules that cherry pie is mezonot even if the majority is the cherry filling.
  33. Cherry wine is a fermented alcoholic beverage made from cherries.S"A 22:8 writes that fruit juices are Shehakol except for the juices that come from grapes and olives. Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 362) and Halachos of Brachos (chap 24, pg 446) rule that cherry wine is Shehakol.
    • The Gemara Brachot 38b quotes a dispute between Rav who says cooked vegetables are HaAdama and Rabbi Yochanan who says that the Bracha is Shehakol. Rav Chisda says that if the vegetable when raw is Shehakol then when it’s cooked it’s HaAdama, however, if it was HaAdama when it’s raw then when it’s cooked it’s Shehakol. Rashi D”H Kol explains that the original Bracha depends on whether it’s eaten when it’s raw, if it is the Bracha is HaAdama, if not it’s Shehakol.
    • Tosfot D”H Mashkachat writes that the halacha is like Rav Chisda, while Rif 27a rules like Rav that cooked vegetables are always HaAdama. However, the Rif agrees that the Bracha on raw vegetables depends on whether it’s eaten raw. Rosh (Brachot 6:15) and Rambam (Brachot 8:3) agree with Tosfot. S”A 25:1 rules like Tosfot.
    • Tosfot (Brachot 38b D""H Mashkachat) seems to say that chestnuts which are only eaten cooked if one eats them raw the bracha is Shehakol. Rabbenu Yonah (Brachot 27a D”H VeShelosha) writes that chestnuts are good raw and cooked and so they are always HaEtz. Similarly, the Tur 22:12 writes that the Maharam said like Tosfot but he argues that our chestnuts are good both raw and cooked.
    • Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, chap 22, pg 398) writes that chestnuts are Shehakol when eaten raw because in America it’s normal to eat chestnuts roasted and not raw. Similarly, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that chestnut is HaEtz when roasted or cooked but when eaten raw is Shehakol except a person who is accustomed to eat them raw in which case one can make HaEtz on it.
    • However, Yalkut Yosef (Klalei Sefer Brachot pg 28-214) writes that chestnut is HaEtz whether its raw or roasted. Rav Ovadyah in Chazon Ovadyah (Brachot pg 14) quotes a number of Rishonim who hold like the Tur but adds that it all depends on the time and place whether it’s normal to be eaten raw and concludes that nowadays it is normal to be eaten raw. (Rav Ovadyah lives in Israel and may only be speaking about the minhag in Israel).
  34. Yalkut Yosef (Klalei Sefer Brachot pg 28-214), Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 362), Vezot HaBracha (pg 393), Halachos of Brachos (pg 456), Rav Mordechai Eliyahu (quoted in Siddur Kol Eliyahu pg 896), Rabbi Abadi, Sh"t Igrot Moshe 2:57, Sh"t Yabea Omer 7:33 and 9:18(94), and Sh"t Or Letzion (vol 2, 14:8) hold that one should make a Shehakol on gum. All of these major opinions argue on the Sh"t Yaskil Avdi 8:2(54) and Birkat Hashem (Rav Moshe HaLevi, vol 2, pg 41) who write that there's no bracha on chewing gum. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 24) and Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 362) write that there's no Bracha Achrona because the requisite amount wasn't eaten.
  35. The Gemara Brachot 4b writes that foods which do not grow from the ground are Shehakol and one of the specific examples mentioned is chicken. This is codified by the S"A 24:1, Vezot HaBracha (pg 389), and Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384).
  36. Mishna Brurah 212:1 writes that a mixture of two foods neither of which is mezonot and one isn’t coming to enhance the other the Bracha depends on the majority. Vezot HaBracha (pg 9), Halachos of Brachos (pg 68), and Laws of Brachos (pg 214) agree. Therefore, Laws of Brachos (pg 362) writes that if there’s no noodles (or rice) in the chicken chow mein then it depends on the majority, if there’s a majority of vegetables the Bracha is HaAdama if the majority is chicken the Bracha is Shehakol.
  37. Aruch HaShulchan 212:2 writes that for two different foods to be considered a single mixture they must be eaten together on a single spoonful. This is quoted by Laws of Brachos (pg 28), Halachos of Brachos (pg 64), and a similar statement is found in Vezot HaBracha (pg 91). Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 24) writes that chicken chow mein which is made with rice, chicken, and vegetables because it is usually eaten on the same forkful has one Bracha which depends on what is the majority, if it’s rice, the Bracha is Mezonot, if it’s chicken, Bracha is Shehakol, and if it’s vegetables the Bracha is HaAdama. [In general, Vezot HaBracha (pg 94) writes that if there’s no majority because there are three foods with different Brachot, then each food requires its own Bracha.]
  38. See next note
  39. Laws of Brachos (pg 362) writes if there are noodles in chicken chow mein the Bracha is Mezonot on the noodles, and Shehakol on the chow mein if it’s mostly chicken or HaAdama on the chow mein if it’s mostly vegetables. However, on pg 385 note 14 he qualifies that this is only the case when the noodles aren’t totally combines however if they are mixed in well then mezonot on the noodles exempts the other ingredients. Also, the OU writes simply that chow mein is mezonot. (Maybe they are assuming the noodles are mixed completely.)
  40. Chicken fricassee is a stewed chicken sometimes cooked with other vegetables. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that chicken fricassee is Shehakol like the Bracha of chicken.
  41. Mishna Brurah 212:1 writes that a mixture of two foods neither of which is mezonot and one isn’t coming to enhance the other the Bracha depends on the majority. Vezot HaBracha (pg 9), Halachos of Brachos (pg 68), and Laws of Brachos (pg 214) agree. Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that chicken salad depends on the majority ingredient, if it's sald then the bracha is HaAdama but if it's chicken then the bracha is Shehakol. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 25) writes that chicken salad is Shehakol because the chicken is primary and the salad is a minority and enhances the chicken. [It's not 1% clear that the Halachos of Brachos would agree with the Laws of Brachos where there is a majority of salad.]
  42. Vezot HaBracha (pg 118, chapter 12) writes that if there’s a significant amount of soup nuts, noodles, or dumplings, and one is interested just as much in the soup as one is interested in the soup nuts, noodles, or dumplings one should only make Mezonot and it exempts the soup. Similarly, Laws of Brachos (pg 363) writes that if there’s a majority of noodles in the soup the Bracha is Mezonot.
  43. Laws of Brachos (pg 363) writes if there’s a small amount of noodles, kneidlach, or soup nuts one makes two Brachot, Shehakol on the soup and Mezonot on the noodles. Similarly, Halachos of Brochos (pg 72, chapter 4, Rabbi Pinchas Bodner) writes that soup nuts enhance the soup and so it requires two Brachot (Mezonot and Shehakol). Vezot HaBracha (pg 117, chapter 12) agrees and says that the same is true of noodles, or dumplings in soup. Vezot HaBracha specifies that this is usually the case when there is a small amount of noodles in the soup.
    • Vezot HaBracha (pg 117) writes that in order to avoid exempting the soup with the mezonot one should say the Shehakol before the Mezonot, while the Halachos of Brachos (pg 72) disagrees saying to make the mezonot first.
  44. See next note
  45. S"A 25:2 writes that vegetable soup is the same Bracha as the vegetable unless meat was added in which case the Bracha is Shehakol. Mishna Brurah 25:13 writes that since the flavor imparted by the meat is more significant that the flavor imparted by the vegetables the broth takes on the bracha of the meat. However, the vegetable itself it's nullified by the soup and requires a HaAdama. Laws of Brachos (pg 334) explains that if the vegetables are large then the bracha on the vegetables is HaAdama and on the soup is Shehakol, however, if the vegetables are small and are added to enhance the soup the bracha of Shehakol on the soup exempts the vegetables. Similarly, Halachos of Brachos (Rabbi Bodner, pg 439) writes that if the vegetables are used to enhance the soup then the Shehakol on the soup exempts the vegetables. He adds (Bracha Handbook pg 25) that regarding Bracha Achrona if one ate a Kezayit of vegetables in Kedi Achilat Pras one should make Boreh Nefashot. However, he notes that there is no Bracha Achrona simply for the broth because one doesn't drink enough of a shiur in the requisite time. This last point is also found in Laws of Brachos (pg 363 and 385, note 3).
  46. With regards to stuffed chicken, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 363 and pg 385, note 16) writes that one should make Mezonot on the stuffing and Shehakol on the chicken because they aren't eaten together on the same forkful. Halachos of Brachos (pg 475) agrees and qutoes Rav Shlomo Zalman who explained that since one usually eats a large portion of the chicken without the stuffing the chicken requires a separate bracha. See "Bread stuffing" where Laws of Brachos and Halachos of Brachos were quoted as saying that the bread stuffing itself was Mezonot. Regarding rice stuffing, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 363) and Halachos of Brachos Handbook (Rabbi Bodner, pg 26) write that on chicken stuffed with rice stuffing requires two Brachot, mezonot on the stuffing and shehakol on the chicken.
  47. Halachos of Brachos (pg 396), Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 363)
  48. Chicory is a bitter vegetable. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that it has the Bracha of HaAdama but no Bracha Achrona because a requisite shuir (amount) isn't eaten.
  49. Halachos of Brachos (pg 482), Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 363)
  50. Chives are a species of onion and not usually eaten separately. Nonetheless, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 363) writes that were it eaten alone the Bracha would be Shehakol and no Bracha achrona because the requisite shiur (amount) wasn't eaten. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 26) writes that it's usually covered by the food it is eaten with.
  51. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 415). Sh"t Igrot Moshe 3:31 wriets that chocolate is shehakol, however, Halachos of Brachos (pg 415, note 53) quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman who questioned this minhag thinking that the proper bracha should be HaEtz but concluded that one shouldn't deviate from the minhag.
  52. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos (pg 26)
  53. S"A 168:6 rules that when one eats Pas HaBa BeKisnin as a snack the Bracha Rishona is Mezonot and Bracha Achrona is Al HaMichya, however, if one eats the amount of a meal the bracha is HaMotzei and Birkat HaMazon. See further Making a meal on Mezonot. S"A 168:7 gives three definitions of Pas Haba BeKisnin and the second one is dough which was kneaded with sweeteners such as honey, oil, or milk to the point that the taste of the sweeteners is recognizable in the cake. However, the Rama argues that it's not Mezonot unless there is a significant amount of sweeteners added. The Mishna Brurah 168:33 explains that according to the S"A the taste of the sweetener must be recognizable in the dough and the Rama holds that it must be the majority in comparison to the flour and also must have a strong taste that's recognizable. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, chap 8, pg 237) writes that certainly chocolate cake, coffee cake, and honey cake certainly would fit this category and on pg 361 he writes that in general cakes besides nut cake are Mezonot unless one ate the amount of a normal meal in which case one would have to make HaMotzei. Halachos of Brachos (chap 27, pg 52) and Vezot HaBracha (pg 394) agree.
  54. Laws of Brachos (pg 215), Halachos of Brachos (pg 417), Vezot HaBracha (pg 96) agree that if one really wants to eat the nut or fruit and one views the chocolate as enhancing the nut/fruit and he really wants to eat the nut/fruit – the Bracha is make on the nut or fruit (ha’etz/ha’adoma). If one really wants to eat the chocolate but the nut enhances the chocolate– then make a shehakol. If he really likes them both (1) Vezot HaBracha (pg 96) writes that one should make the Bracha on the majority ingredient and if one can’t determine the majority make Shehakol and (2) Laws of Brachos (pg 215) writes that one should make HaEtz except on chocolate covered peanuts which requires two Brachot (make Shehakol on chocolate covering and HaAdama when one reaches the nut).
  55. Vezot Habracha ch. 3 p. 24 writes that the matzah remains hamotzei even if it is less than a kezayit since it wasn't cooked in a kli rishon.
  56. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  57. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that chocolate éclair is mezonot. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 55) writes that the mezonot on the cake part of it covers the custard.
  58. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 28). See discussion of sugar and chocolate.
  59. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 28). See discussion of milk and chocolate.
  60. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  61. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 28)
  62. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) considers yeast cake to be Pas HaBa BeKisnin.
  63. Chopped liver is primary made of broiled liver which should be shehakol as is any meat (S"A 24:1). Halachos of Brachos Handbook (pg 28) explains that if the choppsed liver is eaten on a cracker then the Bracha on the cracker covers the chopped liver, however, if the chopped liver isn't eaten to enhance the crakcer such as where one likes the chopped liver equally to the cracker, then two brachos are required, mezonot on the cracker and shehakol on the chopped liver. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) also writes chopped liver is shehakol.
  64. Halachos of Brachos (Rabbi Bodner, chap 4, pg 61-8) writes that in order for one to make one Bracha on a mixture of two foods it must be considered a single physical mass (by having small pieces mixed together so that the ingredients would be eaten together in a single spoonful) or be cooked or baked together. He continues, that when determining the bracha on a mixture of food, if there is grain flour that was cooked it's automatically Mezonot, if there's one food that's primary and the others enhance it, the bracha is made on the primary food, and if there's no grain flour or primary ingredient, the bracha is made upon the majority ingredient. Laws of Brachos (pg 27-227) seems to agree on the above set of laws. Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes if a chow mein is made with rice and vegetables, in which case he assumes that neither food is primary, one makes a bracha on the majoirty ingredient.
  65. See next note
  66. S"A 28:2 writes that if flour of the five grains is mixed into a food the Bracha is mezonot even if it is in the minority. Mishna Brurah 212:1 references this in the laws of Ikar VeTofel. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 385, note 14) writes that if the noodles aren't cooked together with the rice and vegetables, then it is only a primary ingredient if it is in the majority. If they are not in majoirty they are neither the primary ingredient in order to exempt the other ingredient or a secondary ingredient which is exempted because it still has the status of cooked grains; thus the food requires two Brachot. Nonetheless, Laws of Brachos adds, if the noodles are mixed well into the chow mein the bracha would be mezonot on everything.
  67. See next footnote
  68. See next footnote
  69. Laws of Brachos (pg 364), Halachos of Brachos (pg 8), and Vezot HaBracha (pg 392) agree that if the pieces of meat or potatoes are big enough that they are eaten alone, one should make a mezonot on the barley and shehakol on meat or haadama on potato, while if the pieces of meat and potatoes are small one should make a mezonot on everything. LeHalacha (pg 6) and Piskei Teshuvot 24 explain that the barley in cholent is mezonot because it's cooked to such an extent that it is Nitmaech. Vezot HaBracha (Birur Halacha) writes that barley in cholent is mezonot because it sticks together with the other barley because of the thick substance of the cholent.
  70. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that a bean chulent without barley is haadama because of the beans and potatoes.
  71. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that chullent with kiske requires a mezonot on the kishke and haadama on the beans and potatoes.
  72. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 29) writes that since the chick peas are ground sufficently the Bracha on chummous the Bracha is Shehakol and not HaAdama. However, Yalkut Yosef (Klalei Sefer Brachot pg 28-214) writes that the Bracha is HaAdama.
  73. S"A 22:8 writes that on all juice (execpt grape juice and olive oil) the Bracha is Shehakol. Vezot HaBracha (Luach HaBrachot note 17) quotes Rav Sheinburg who says that even if there is pulp in the juice the bracha remains Shehakol. Therefore, the Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that cider (fermented alcoholic beverage made from apple juice) is Shehakol.
  74. S"A 22:17 writes that if one eats cinnamon the Bracha is HaAdama. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) rules that this is the halacha, while Vezot HaBracha (p. 22 note 73) writes that the halacha in S"A is only when cinnamon was eaten alone, however, nowadays when it isn't eaten alone the bracha is Shehakol.
  75. Cinnamon Roll is a type of cake and fits the specific definition of Pas Haba BeKisnin as bread which is kneaded with sweeteners. Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) and Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 29) write that cinnamon roll is mezonot, unless one eats a Keviyut Seuda in which case the bracha is HaMotzee.
  76. S"A 28:2 writes that if flour of the five grains is mixed into a food the Bracha is mezonot even if it is in the minority. Since the first ingredient is wheat, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), and Star K Brachot of cereal list write that the bracha on cinnamin toast crunch is mezonot.
    • Rava in Gemara Brachot 36b says that dry peppercorn and dry ginger don’t require a bracha, whereas moist peppercorn and moist ginger have a bracha. The Rif (Brachot 25b) and Rambam (Brachot 8:7) rule that moist ginger and peppercorn is HaAdama and dry ones don’t have any bracha because they are spices and not food. Tosfot (Brachot 36b s.v. BeRetivah) agrees that the bracha for the moist spices are HaAdama but they’re reason is that its not commonly eaten while dry.
    • The Rosh (Brachot 6:6), however, distinguishes between moist ginger, which requires a HaAdama, and moist peppercorn, which requires HaEtz. He supports his contention from the Gemara that says peppercorn trees are obligated in Orlah, a law specific to trees. Rabbenu Yonah (Brachot 25b s.v. Pilpili) and Tur 22:18 agree.
    • The Bet Yosef 22:18 quotes the Chiddushei HaRashba and Raavad as agreeing with the Rosh, and Rav Hai Goan agreeing with the Rif. Shaar HaTzion 22:89 quotes the Raah and Gra as ruling like the Rosh in opposition to the Eshkol, Smag, and Bahag as holding like the Rif.
    • The Rashba (responsa 1:4) defends the Rif who says that moist peppercorn is HaAdama because the peppercorn is primarily planted in order to be eaten as a spice with other foods. He says that it really should have been Shehakol (like Koreh) if not for the fact that it is also sometimes eaten while moist and so its HaAdama instead of HaEtz. Magen Avraham 22:35 and Mishna Brurah 22:82 quotes this explanation.
    • Darkei Moshe 22:2 explains that the halacha should be to make HaAdama because after the fact if one made a HaAdama on a fruit one fulfilled one’s obligation. S”A 22:18 agrees. Bach 22:1 writes that such as is the minhag.
    • Sh”t Shelat Yaavetz 2:142 writes that the bracha on roasted cocoa beans is HaAdama because its not planted primarily to be eaten that way. Machzik Bracha 24:3 quotes this. Birkat Hashem (vol 3, p. 41) explains that the Yaavetz compared cocoa beans to moist peppercorn, which is lowered from its status of HaEtz to HaAdama because its not planted primarily for that purpose. However, Birkat Hashem concludes that the bracha for cocoa powder or roasted coffee beans is Shehakol since nowadays no one eats them that way. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) agrees that cocoa is Shehakol.
  77. The main ingredient in cocoa pebbles is rice. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that the bracha on cocoa pebbles is mezonot. The Star-K agrees.
  78. Rava in Gemara Brachot 36b says that dry peppercorn and dry ginger don’t require a bracha. This is codified by the Tur and S"A 22:16. Mishna Brurah 22:79 explains that since these are always eaten together with other ingredients, by eating them plain, there is no benefit and as such no bracha is required. Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that unsweetened cocoa requires no bracha.
  79. The main ingredient in cocoa puffs is corn flour. Like all products made primary from corn flour, the bracha is Shehakol (See Corn and potato products). Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that cocoa puffs is Shehakol. The Star-K agrees.
  80. The Mishna (Brachot 35a) states that the bracha on fruits is HaEtz. This is codified by S"A 22:1. Vezot Habracha (Luach HaBrachot, p. 396) and Yalkut Yosef (Klalei Sefer Brachot pg 28-214) write that coconut is HaEtz. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) agrees and adds that even shredded coconut is HaEtz. Regarding shredded or crushed fruits and vegetables, see Processed fruits and vegetables .
  81. S"A 22:8 writes that the bracha on any juice that comes from fruit or vegetables is Shehakol. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) and Vezot Habracha (Luach HaBrachot, p. 396) write the bracha on coconut milk is Shehakol.
  82. *Regarding Bracha Rishona: Kitzur S"A 53:3 and Vezot HaBracha (pg 396-7) write that the bracha for coffee and tea is Shehakol. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) agrees. See Bracha_on_Coffee_and_Tea for the full explanation. *Regarding Bracha Achrona: Mishna Brurah 21:1 writes that there is a major dispute whether one should recite a bracha achrona if one sipped a hot cup of coffee or tea slowly. He concludes that the minhag is not to make a bracha achrona, however, those who are strict would leave over a Revi'it until the drink cools down so that one could drink it quickly and make a Boreh Nefashot. Vezot haBracha (ch. 5, p. 4) agrees. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that one should recite a Boreh Nefashot unless it is sipped slowly.
  83. Coffee cakes like other cakes are made with flour, sugar, and oil or butter. According to the second condition of Pas HaBa BeKisnin, the bracha on cakes is Mezonot unless one would be Koveh Seudah in which case the bracha is HaMotzei (S"A 168:6-7). Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 237) and Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 3) write that the bracha on coffee cake is mezonot.
  84. Cognac is a type of brandy, which is distilled wine. The Mor Ukesiah 22 writes that the bracha on brandy (yayin saraf) is Hagefen since the distilling process improves the taste of the wine. The Chida in Machzik Bracha 22:2 argues that since the look, smell, and taste of brandy is different than wine, the bracha on brandy is shehakol. He concludes that such is the minhag. Kaf HaChaim 22:15 quotes the above dispute. Halachos of Brachos (p. 447) and Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 321) rule that the bracha on cognac is Shehakol. See Bracha:Brandy. * Regarding bracha achrona: Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 3) writes that if a revi'it isn't consumed within the time span of Kedi Shtiyat Revi'it no bracha achrona is required.
  85. Coleslaw is made from shredded raw cabbage with spices, dressing, and other vegetables. The Mishna (Brachot 35a) writes that the bracha on vegetables is Haadama. This is codified by S"A 25:1. S"A 25:1 writes that cooked cabbage is haadama, while raw cabbage is shehakol since its better when its cooked. Mishna Brurah 25:3 writes that if most people eat cabbage raw, the bracha for raw cabbage would be haadama. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 292) clarifies that if majority of people would eat a certain species of cabbage raw the bracha for that species would be haadama. Thus, Laws of Brachos (p. 364) and Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 3) write that coleslaw is haadama.
  86. S"A 28:4, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384). See the Raw_or_roasted_grain page.
  87. S"A 28:2, Mishna Brurah 28:3, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384). See the Raw_or_roasted_grain page.
  88. S"A 28:2, Mishna Brurah 28:3, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 271). Laws of Brachos (p. 271) writes that whole grain which is partially cooked and partially retain thier form, there is a dispute whether the bracha is haadama or mezonot. See, however, Laws of Brachos (p. 365) who writes that partially dissolved cooked grain is mezonot. See the Raw_or_roasted_grain page.
  89. Cookies are made with flour, eggs, sugar, and oil or butter. According to the second condition of Pas HaBa BeKisnin, the bracha on cookies is Mezonot unless one would be Koveh Seudah in which case the bracha is HaMotzei (S"A 168:6-7). Therefore, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 365) and Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 31) write that the bracha on cookies is mezonot.
  90. Vezot HaBracha (p. 363) writes that raw dough is Shehakol and in his explanation (p. 376, note 75) he writes that this is based on the halacha of wheat flour which has the Bracha of Shehakol as discussed in S”A 28:5.
  91. The Mishna (Brachot 35a) writes that the bracha on vegetables is Haadama. This is codified by S"A 25:1. Therefore, The Laws of Brachos (p. 365) and The Halachos of Brachos (p. 396) write that corn is Haadama.
  92. Halachos of Brachos Handbook (p. 31) writes that corn bread which are really primarily made from wheat flour are hamotzei like regular bread. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 386, n. 2) agrees that if it is fit to be eaten as bread, the bracha is hamotzei. However, he concludes that if the corn bread is more like cake than bread because of its distinct corn (and sweet cakey) taste, the bracha is mezonot, unless one is Koveh Seudah on it.
  93. Mishna Brurah 28:33 quoting Chatom Sofer (responsa 50), Laws of Brachos (p. 365). Note, however, that mostly all corn breads are made with grain flour (other than corn flour).
  94. The main ingredient in corn chex is corn meal and corn starch. In general, the bracha on corn products, in which the corn is ground into flour is Shehakol (See the Corn_and_potato_products page). Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) and Star-K write that corn chex is Shehakol.
  95. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) wites that corn chips are Shehakol. Veten Bracha (Halachos of Brochos by Rabbi Bodner pg 41, chapter 22) writes that corn tortillas and corn chips are shehakol since both are processed to the point where they loose their ideal brocha. Rav Yisrael Belsky in Shulchan HaLevi (3:13 p. 37) rules that corn chips or corn tortillas are Shehakol in America or any country in which the majority of the corn isn't planted in order to be eaten as corn chips or tortillas. He explains that corn chips are made from cornmeal (corn flour) and so the bracha is Shehakol.
  96. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384), Rav Yisrael Belsky in Shulchan HaLevi (3:13 p. 37)
  97. In general, the bracha on corn products, in which the corn is ground into flour is Shehakol (See the Corn_and_potato_products page). Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that corn flakes made from corn flour is Shehakol.
  98. Corn Fritters are made from corn kernels, egg, flour, and milk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_fritters) and are fried or baked. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that the bracha on corn fritters are Shehakol.
  99. Corn muffins are made with wheat flour, cornmeal, eggs, sugar, and oil or butter. According to the second condition of Pas HaBa BeKisnin, the bracha on corn muffins is Mezonot unless one would be Koveh Seudah in which case the bracha is HaMotzei (S"A 168:6-7). Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that corn muffins are mezonot unless one is Koveh Seudah in which case one is hamotzei.
  100. In general, the bracha on corn products, in which the corn is ground into flour is Shehakol (See the Corn_and_potato_products page). Thus, Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384) writes that corn muffins without wheat flour are Shehakol.
  101. The main ingredient in corn pops is milled corn. Laws of Brachos (Rabbi Forst, pg 359-384)
  102. http://halachayomit.co.il/he/ReadHalacha.aspx?HalachaID=1173